Veterans’ Affairs Oral History Project

David Watt was working in a menswear store in Palmerin St, Warwick when he was called up to serve in World War II.  He was 18 years old and, like the rest of his mates, thought the whole affair would be over in a couple of months.  Mr Watt’s personal account of his time at war will be added to hundreds of other veterans’ stories as part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Oral History Project. For full story click here.

Rosie the Riveter

For many American families, the Great Depression and Dust Bowl struck like swift punches to the gut. New Deal work relief programs like the Works Progress Administration tossed lifelines into the crushing economic waves, but many young people soon started looking farther west for more stable opportunities.  Read full article and watch video interview excerpts here.

Seattle’s Working Women of World War II

After Pearl Harbor, the United States went to war, and Seattle became a total blackout town – no lights anywhere at night. Spotters scanned the skies and scoured the waters of Puget Sound, looking for Japanese war planes and submarines. People of Japanese descent were sent to internment camps inland. Soon, everything became scarce, from butter to sugar to cloth.  And Seattle’s industries mobilized to produce the machines of war, with women leading the charge to build them.  For full story click here.

Canadian WWII Veterans

A new exhibit at the Dorval Museum of Local History and Heritage brings the bloody conflict to life with stories and souvenirs from some of Dorval’s own veterans.  Survival and Resilience: A Tribute to World War II Veterans showcases artifacts belonging to more than a dozen veterans as well as a video featuring first-person accounts from three local veterans, still living and now in their 90s. See full story and watch video here.

Japanese American Oral History Program

The Manzanar Committee announced on March 26 that Dr. Arthur A. Hansen, renowned scholar and co-founder of the Japanese American Oral History Program, and educator and former Manzanar incarceree Mas Okui have been chosen as the 2014 recipients of the Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award.  A pioneering effort over four decades, the Japanese American Oral History Project recorded and transcribed hundreds of interviews and, periodically, illuminated their contents and perspectives in published anthologies and unpublished theses. Along with Mitson, Hansen also coordinated the first lecture series on the World War II incarceration of Japanese Americans, which included a presentation by Embrey. Hansen and Mitson also authored the pioneering oral history book “Voices Long Silent: An Oral History Inquiry into the Japanese American Evacuation.”  For full story click here.